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 What To Do When a Hot Engine Is Hard To Start 
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Post What To Do When a Hot Engine Is Hard To Start
What To Do When a Hot Engine Is Hard To Start
by: Jakob Jelling

Although usually engines exposed to cold weather is the most known problem related to car starting difficulties, hot engines might bring obstacles as well. Many people realize that the car do not start as easily as it should when the engine is hot and do not know what to do about it. In order to be able to overcome this problem, it is important to start by learning why it happens.

Most of the reasons by which a hot engine would be hard to start are based on problems related to the fuel. When the engine is too hot, fuel can't circulate properly due to the way in which vapor obstructs it and therefore the engine wouldn't start as easily as it should or it wouldn't start at all.

A car engine would keep on gaining temperature until a while after it was shut off. During this period of time is when the highest amount of vapor would be circulating around and therefore that is when the chances it obstructs the engine are bigger as well. This way, if you are driving in hot weather and you have just turned off the car in which you experience start problems, you should wait for a few minutes until starting it back.

Fuel injected engines do not experience this problem as much as others do due to the fact that the fuel remains inside the injectors by being under a very high pressure. This way, fuel injected engines would not become so easily obtruded by vapors as other engines would and therefore the car would not have the same problems to start as another would.

Also, engines might become hard to start while being hot if it coincides with the season in which refiners change from a fuel blend to another. Sometimes gasoline refiners change from a higher volatility fuel to a lower one when summer approaches due to the way in which hot weather causes fuel to evaporate easier. If refiners change back to a higher volatility fuel while the engine is still exposed to days of high temperatures, this could cause the fuel to evaporate too much creating too much vapor and therefore obtruding the engine.

About The Author


Jakob Jelling is the founder of http://www.autorized.com. Please visit his website to learn about auto maintenance, auto insurance, auto safety and much more!




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Wed Jul 18, 2007 2:13 pm
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